Do You Know How To Better Control Negotiations? Negotiation Tip of the Week

“I’m not sure who was being manipulated, us or the opposing negotiators. They seemed to be negotiating by a hidden power source. Over the 3-week course of the negotiation, they constantly took exception with the positions they adopted. Something kept making them change their position!” Those were the words of an overly befuddled negotiator as he lamented about the tactics the opposing negotiation team employed.

In every negotiation, there are four factors that you should be aware of. Those factors have a profound impact on the flow and outcome of the negotiation. Thus, if you’re aware of how and when to use them, you’ll have better control of the #negotiation. Those factors are money, power, ego, and control.

Money

Some people are motivated by money for its purchasing value. Others use it as a way to keep score (i.e. point the direction of their success, up or down). In either case, the outcome of the negotiation may hinge on the perception one has of how much he gained, compared to how much you got and/or he left you with.

If you’re engaged in a negotiation with someone of this mindset, realize that money is the source through which he’ll evaluate the negotiation’s outcome. To combat this mindset, speak in terms of money per how he’ll lose opportunities if he doesn’t accept your offers. You can also use scarcity (i.e. the offer will only last a short time) to motivate him to take action sooner versus later. Keep in mind that you may possess something more valuable to him than money.

Power

Everyone wants the semblance of power. You need to know their sense of power in order to understand what source(s) might stimulate them to action (i.e. why they want it, what they’ll do with it, how it will make them feel).

Once you understand their sense and source(s) of power, you’ll have greater insight as to how to advantage it. Addressing it may be in the form of allowing the other negotiator to think he has power, based on the demeanor you project (i.e. someone that’s non-confrontational, go along to get along).

Ego

Everyone has an ego. In some negotiations, it may behoove you to deny the recognition of someone’s prestige, accomplishments, or whatever recognition sought from you by the other negotiator. The lack of recognition, related to one’s achievements, can be a powerful strategy to employ. You can withhold or extend acclamations until he acclimates to your position.

You can use praise for this purpose. You’d stroke his ego, when appropriate, to keep him aligned with the outcome you seek. Vary the degree of stroking based on the intent and outcome sought! In either case, make him feel that he’s earned what you grant him.

Control

Control is a human factor that determines how safe or unsafe someone feels. Like the other factors mentioned, control is perceptional. Thus, if you think you have or don’t have it, you’re right.

To create the fa├žade of the other negotiator having control in the negotiation, make concessions that may appear to be to your detriment; red herrings can be used for this purpose. In some cases, granting control at the appropriate time can be a way to control the negotiation. Before granting it, know it’s perceived value.

When you utilize the four factors mentioned above in your negotiations, you’ll be better positioned to use those factors to your benefit. Doing so will allow you to maximize your negotiation efforts… and everything will be right with the world.

MyVideoTalk Presentation – Quick Tips and A Reverse Lead Generation Strategy

MyVideoTalk is a twenty first century application that has stirred up a lot of excitement. With the help of these software programs, several people have easily accomplished their tedious task of organizing meetings across the world, creating presentations, sharing videos, downloading and emailing footage or, sending video emails to their customers, etc. Furthermore, MyVideoTalk is an increasingly popular MLM network that offers a competitive business opportunity. Many people attempt to concentrate on the actual MyVideoTalk presentation in order to see results.

Exposure is the first step for your MyVideoTalk presentation. You have to expose your products in front of targeted customers. Attract them towards you and increase their curiosity. Make your prospects familiar with the applications and then schedule an appointment.

There are many different methods for showcasing your MyVideoTalk presentation. You just have to select a type that is suitable for your prospects. Promote the well-liked applications of the package in front of the corporate professionals. Some popular features are:

  • Live My Video Talk
  • Online prerecorded broadcast
  • One on One MyVideoTalk presentation
  • MyVideo Webmail.

Where most MyVideoTalk Sales Reps can fall short

Promoting your MyVideoTalk presentation upfront works a little, however it takes away from the value that YOU bring to the table. You need to position yourself as a leader and give people value upfront and then expose them to your MyVideoTalk presentation. This may seem backwards from what your upline is teaching you, however I’d look at the results of what you’re currently doing and ask yourself two questions:

1. Am I doing everything my upline says and seeing little to no results?

2. Can my Team (downline) duplicate my success?

If the answer is No to any of those questions, then it’s time you learn the truth about marketing these types of businesses online. Put yourself in the forefront, attract leads to YOU, expose them to your MyVideoTalk presentation on the back end, and watch your business grow. If you want to know the ins and outs of this, then check out the resource box below.

Presenting With Power While Being Seated

Presenting can be done in various ways. Most of the time speakers stand in front of an audience at an event in a convention center, facing a group of clients at their company’s conference room or addressing a crowd at their community center to give a few examples. The tools that we have at hand to improve our presentation skills normally focus on these situations. What if you have to present while being seated? This can happen at a small meeting e.g. delivering the quarterly results to your board members, having a sales meeting with one potential client, addressing a small interest group or perhaps your health or physical condition prevents you from standing. Check out the following tips to make an impact when you and your audience are seated.

1. Positioning yourself at the table

When you sit at a table (for instance to make a presentation to your board members), the upper part of the body is visible only. Realize that if you are a tall person that you loose the impact of your length. How can you compensate that?

- If possible sit at the head of the table to increase your visibility.

- Make visible eye contact with everyone around the table, let every single person in the room know that you see them. Call them by their names if appropriate during the meeting to strengthen the connection.

- Sit up straight, keep your back in a comfortable yet upright position.

- Keep your head up and avoid looking at the table.

- Focus on your breath, breathe slowly and deep in your belly. Imagine that the air is going through your body, down your belly, down your legs and feet into the floor. This will relax you and give you clarity of mind.

- Focus on your feet and make a conscious connection with the floor, this will ground you. Keep your legs next to each other and notice how solid this will make you feel. It will add power to your speech.

- Put your arms on the table to increase the solid position. You can leave your hands with the palms on the table or folded over each other, avoid the ‘prayer’ position (clasping your hands) or folding your fore arms as it will block your open position. It is OK if you alternate between all of these.

- Use your head, arms and hands to make gestures that support your speech.

- When you like to sit back in your chair, try not to appear too comfortable: don’t sag, keep your back as straight as possible, put your arms on the arm rests or relaxed in your lap if the chair has no arm rests. Relax but show that you are alert.

- Your emotions will be picked up easily when people are sitting close. Use your facial expressions adequately: smile and express your enthusiasm. Be sincere and do not hide your feelings but balance the way you express them because they will have a larger impact then addressing a huge room full of people.

2. Focusing on your voice

When you present ‘up-close and personal’ in a small group at the table, you need to be aware that your voice has a huge impact. You will most likely speak without a microphone and sometimes without visual aids so you need to pay special attention that you will be heard and your audience can follow you:

- Speak slowly but not too slow.

- Speak clearly but not too loud.

- Articulate well and use tone variations.

- Pause and renew eye contact.

- Breathe into your belly to relax yourself and support your voice

- Use the right words e.g. include metaphors and describe images that people can relate to. This will support the audience to follow your story.

3. The use of visual aids

When you deliver a presentation at a table you can use visual aids to add structure and focus to your speech. Pay attention to the following:

- If you use a laptop: make sure you don’t hide behind it, it should not block your upper body.

- Put some key points on a flip chart or white board and stand up now and then to address the key messages or to point where you are in your story. This will make the presentation more lively.

- When you don’t use a flip chart or white board, you can use notes or distribute your presentation as a supplement to the agenda. Stay aware that people might be distracted by these papers. They will read them, check them to follow your line of thought. Don’t look at the papers too much yourself, you will loose eye contact. A pause in your speech will usually draw them back to you.

- When you use PowerPoint slides on a screen then you should stand to create a connection with the audience and not sit down while everyone is facing the screen. A connection is made with people not slides. If you can’t stand, sit next to the screen to make yourself visible.

Next time when you have a meeting or presentation use a few of these suggestions and when people take their seats you know that you will have an impact even if you are not the ‘chair’!