Job Interview Tip: How to Present a 30/60/90-Day Plan

I’ve been a recruiter and career coach for over 10 years now, and I have always recommended that my candidates use a 30/60/90-day plan in their job interviews, because I used it when I was an employee in the job search. I saw phenomenal results from using it, and my candidates do, too.

Why? A 30/60/90-day plan is an outline for what you’ll do as a new employee in the first 3 months. It shows that you understand the job, can do the job, and will do the job. It’s an “above and beyond” step that impresses hiring managers and alleviates any doubts they may have about your fit for the job. It facilitates the interview conversation, and makes you a stronger candidate.

But the other day, a candidate came back to me and said that he created the plan, but the hiring manager didn’t want to see it. He tried to bring it out and present it, but the interview, which hadn’t been going all that well so far, went from bad to worse. The candidate’s question was, of course, “What should I have done?”

It’s very rare for a hiring manager to not want to see a candidate’s 90-day plan, but when they don’t, it’s typically because they’ve already decided that it’s glaringly obvious to them that you’re not who they want to hire. There’s usually some issue there (which could be anything from experience to education to personality) that you’re just not going to be able to overcome.

In other cases, it’s simply a matter of how you’ve presented the plan. You don’t just come out of the blue in the job interview and say, “I have a 30/60/90-day plan I’d like to show you.” You have to time it right.

For your best time to present your plan, you’re waiting for the trigger point-that question that they ask that is something like,

“How would you do X?”
“What would you do in the first few months on the job?”
“How would you approach this problem?”
“How would you segment your market/customers?”
“What tasks would you tackle first?”

Any question along those lines works. That’s when you say something like, “I’m so glad you asked. Let me show you some of the notes I’ve taken on how I would approach this. They might not be perfect, but if we can talk about this together, you’re going to have a much better picture of my understanding of the job and I’m going to end up with a better understanding of the job, which is a win-win for both of us. Because if I understand the job, and you understand who I am, then we can make a better decision about whether or not to move forward with this.” Most managers will respond to that attitude and explanation very positively.

So, if a manager is not receptive to your 30/60/90-day plan, it’s either because (1) you’re absolutely not a good fit for the job; or (2) you’re just not introducing it at the right time. Keep that in mind when you go into your next interview, and I wish you the best of luck.

Debt Negotiation Tips – Why Unsecured Debt is Easier to Negotiate Now

Did you hear about debt negotiation tips six months back? The answer is no. This is because debt negotiation tips were not required. People were earning stable incomes and paying their dues in an easy manner. The present situation is a completely different scenario. Do you know why credit card companies are finding it hard to recover their dues? The unemployment rate is one of the reasons. As people are losing their jobs, they do not have enough money to pay their bills. Use the right debt negotiation tips and get your liabilities eliminated. What kind of debt negotiation tips do you need?

Attractive deals require good debt negotiation tips

If credit card firms are passing through a bad phase, this does not mean that you will be offered the best package without making any efforts. You need to bargain about each and everything. Mostly customers argue about the payment period and the installment size with the money granting company. If they get more time, the installment size is large.

Key debt negotiation tips to handle your creditor

Let’s look at some important factors required to handle the creditor.

· Do not sound desperate at any stage. If you do then the money granting company will try to convince you for a low percentage. Be firm and show that you deserve a good deal. If an experienced consultant is representing you, you don’t have to take these pressures.

· Money granting companies are quite rigid if the customer hides a point from his consultant. Do not hide any kind of information from the firm which is representing you. If you have been a defaulter in the past, your consultant should be aware of this fact.

· Generally financial companies are going through a lean patch but all of them are not facing the same kinds of troubles. Some firms offering settlements but they are in a strong financial situation. Hence, you cannot expect them to offer large reductions. On the other hand, if the financial firm is in a weak situation, it will accept anything. You can even get a reduction of eighty percent in that situation. This is because the firm will be desperate to get money. As a customer, you should analyze the condition of your credit card company before you take any kind of a decision. Using the right negotiation tips is really important.

Public Speaking – When You Use This Talk Template, Your Presentation Will Practically Give Itself!

To have a presentation that’s easy to follow and easy to understand-which should be any speaker’s objective-there needs to be a clear sense of organization. The beauty of a well-organized talk is it not only helps the audience follow along and stay with you, but it also helps you stay on track and not lose your train of thought.

The simplest, yet most powerful, tool for organizing and delivering your thoughts logically and coherently is the “talk template.”

Here’s an outline and explanation of the elements of the template. Note it’s divided into three parts. But it’s not three equal parts. Like the famous sandwich of the comic strip character Dagwood, all the meat is in the middle. The intro and conclusion serve to hold it all together, to add a little flavor and interest, but the body is the meat of your talk-it’s what you’ve got to say.

I. INTRODUCTION: The introduction sets the stage, establishes your credibility, gets your momentum going, and makes the audience want to listen to you. Two components:

A.    Hook: get the audience’s attention. Reel ‘em in. A great hook will make the audience take notice and want to listen to you. Possible hooks include: an anecdote, story, prop or visual, question, quotation, startling statement.

B.     Reason to Listen: Tell the audience how they’ll benefit from your talk. How will it will make them happier, safer, more successful, make their jobs easier, make their wallets thicker?

II.             BODY: This is the meat of your talk. Here is where you present your main ideas in a logical order and explain and elaborate on each point as much as your time limit allows. It’s composed of:

A.    Road Map: Just as a map on a road trip helps you know where you’re going, a road map for your talk lets the audience know where you’re going to take them. It makes it easier for them to follow along. This is the same thing as the classic speech adage, “Tell ‘em what you’re going to tell ‘em.”

B.     Main Points: Identify your main ideas-usually about three to five-and chose the most logical way to order them.

  • Topical-your main points are arranged by particular topics.
  • Chronological-your main points follow a natural sequential flow, such explaining a recipe.
  • Spatial-your points are arranged according to geography, such as reports about the North, South, East and West divisions; or a description of a room, a building, a city.
  • Problem-Solution-you explain the problem you encountered, then describe how you solved (or propose to solve) it.

III.    CONCLUSION: The ending of your talk is important because it’s your last chance to make a good impression. To be effective, it should have two elements, plus note how the Q&A is inserted:

  1. Summary: bring it all home, wrap it all up, deliver one final gem that embodies the essence of what you’ve said.
  2. Q&A. In order preserve the impact of your close, consider opening the floor for questions before you deliver your closing. After your Q&A session, you deliver your closing statement.
  3. Closing: bring the talk to a definitive and memorable end. You can use the same tools in closing as in your hook: an anecdote, story, prop or visual, quotation.

A final thought about your template. Don’t write it out word for word. Instead, outline it with key words and bullet points-enough to keep you on track, but not so much that you feel the need to read them. This will enable you to be conversational and natural, a great attribute of a compelling speaker.