Job Interview Tip: How to Present a 30/60/90-Day Plan

I’ve been a recruiter and career coach for over 10 years now, and I have always recommended that my candidates use a 30/60/90-day plan in their job interviews, because I used it when I was an employee in the job search. I saw phenomenal results from using it, and my candidates do, too.

Why? A 30/60/90-day plan is an outline for what you’ll do as a new employee in the first 3 months. It shows that you understand the job, can do the job, and will do the job. It’s an “above and beyond” step that impresses hiring managers and alleviates any doubts they may have about your fit for the job. It facilitates the interview conversation, and makes you a stronger candidate.

But the other day, a candidate came back to me and said that he created the plan, but the hiring manager didn’t want to see it. He tried to bring it out and present it, but the interview, which hadn’t been going all that well so far, went from bad to worse. The candidate’s question was, of course, “What should I have done?”

It’s very rare for a hiring manager to not want to see a candidate’s 90-day plan, but when they don’t, it’s typically because they’ve already decided that it’s glaringly obvious to them that you’re not who they want to hire. There’s usually some issue there (which could be anything from experience to education to personality) that you’re just not going to be able to overcome.

In other cases, it’s simply a matter of how you’ve presented the plan. You don’t just come out of the blue in the job interview and say, “I have a 30/60/90-day plan I’d like to show you.” You have to time it right.

For your best time to present your plan, you’re waiting for the trigger point-that question that they ask that is something like,

“How would you do X?”
“What would you do in the first few months on the job?”
“How would you approach this problem?”
“How would you segment your market/customers?”
“What tasks would you tackle first?”

Any question along those lines works. That’s when you say something like, “I’m so glad you asked. Let me show you some of the notes I’ve taken on how I would approach this. They might not be perfect, but if we can talk about this together, you’re going to have a much better picture of my understanding of the job and I’m going to end up with a better understanding of the job, which is a win-win for both of us. Because if I understand the job, and you understand who I am, then we can make a better decision about whether or not to move forward with this.” Most managers will respond to that attitude and explanation very positively.

So, if a manager is not receptive to your 30/60/90-day plan, it’s either because (1) you’re absolutely not a good fit for the job; or (2) you’re just not introducing it at the right time. Keep that in mind when you go into your next interview, and I wish you the best of luck.

Route To Success – Effective Sales Presentation

One of the ways to cultivate these skills is to enroll in a sales presentation training program. These presentation skills courses provide guidelines that will help you in making successful sales presentations. They have experienced faculty to help train their students.

They also provide an opportunity to each student to practice during the sessions. This way, the students get a practical experience as well. They give students content and homework assignments that give them a chance to employ their acquired skills immediately. These courses also have a role playing session wherein the students get a feel of how they would have to perform and what difficulties they may face.

Those of you who opt for such a training course will learn the importance of making effective presentations. You will also learn how to use various techniques to get the desired results. You will be taught the working of different visual aids and the manner in which you can create effective slide presentations. These courses enable you to overcome your nervousness and deliver your presentation with confidence to inspire trust.

However, many institutes that offer sales presentation training courses take a specific time period before the program ends. To save this time, you can remember some of these tips that will definitely help you in improving your sales presentation skills.

Control your body language

During your sales pitch, make sure that you hold your body correctly. Your body language communicates a tremendous amount of information to the audience about your personality. If you show confidence in your body language, facial expressions and stance, you will be able to impress your prospects even more. The confidence of your body will motivate them to build a trust in whatever you say, resulting in good sales.

Become an enthusiastic leader

As a sales person, it is your job to lead your prospects into buying what you are selling. They are listening to you to get something from you. Therefore, if you want the audience to get excited about your service or product, create this emotion within yourself first. Do anything that excites you. Clap your hands, jump up and down. This would become a warm up for your presentation.

Prepare the prospects

You have to prepare your audience for the presentation.You can play some kind of music, depending on the audience you are going to address, before you step on the stage. This will act as an emotional warm up that will set the mood of the audience.

Following these tips can help you make a commendable sales presentation. If the mood is set and the preparations are made, there will never be a doubt of you giving a memorable presentation.

Do You Know How To Better Control Negotiations? Negotiation Tip of the Week

“I’m not sure who was being manipulated, us or the opposing negotiators. They seemed to be negotiating by a hidden power source. Over the 3-week course of the negotiation, they constantly took exception with the positions they adopted. Something kept making them change their position!” Those were the words of an overly befuddled negotiator as he lamented about the tactics the opposing negotiation team employed.

In every negotiation, there are four factors that you should be aware of. Those factors have a profound impact on the flow and outcome of the negotiation. Thus, if you’re aware of how and when to use them, you’ll have better control of the #negotiation. Those factors are money, power, ego, and control.

Money

Some people are motivated by money for its purchasing value. Others use it as a way to keep score (i.e. point the direction of their success, up or down). In either case, the outcome of the negotiation may hinge on the perception one has of how much he gained, compared to how much you got and/or he left you with.

If you’re engaged in a negotiation with someone of this mindset, realize that money is the source through which he’ll evaluate the negotiation’s outcome. To combat this mindset, speak in terms of money per how he’ll lose opportunities if he doesn’t accept your offers. You can also use scarcity (i.e. the offer will only last a short time) to motivate him to take action sooner versus later. Keep in mind that you may possess something more valuable to him than money.

Power

Everyone wants the semblance of power. You need to know their sense of power in order to understand what source(s) might stimulate them to action (i.e. why they want it, what they’ll do with it, how it will make them feel).

Once you understand their sense and source(s) of power, you’ll have greater insight as to how to advantage it. Addressing it may be in the form of allowing the other negotiator to think he has power, based on the demeanor you project (i.e. someone that’s non-confrontational, go along to get along).

Ego

Everyone has an ego. In some negotiations, it may behoove you to deny the recognition of someone’s prestige, accomplishments, or whatever recognition sought from you by the other negotiator. The lack of recognition, related to one’s achievements, can be a powerful strategy to employ. You can withhold or extend acclamations until he acclimates to your position.

You can use praise for this purpose. You’d stroke his ego, when appropriate, to keep him aligned with the outcome you seek. Vary the degree of stroking based on the intent and outcome sought! In either case, make him feel that he’s earned what you grant him.

Control

Control is a human factor that determines how safe or unsafe someone feels. Like the other factors mentioned, control is perceptional. Thus, if you think you have or don’t have it, you’re right.

To create the fa├žade of the other negotiator having control in the negotiation, make concessions that may appear to be to your detriment; red herrings can be used for this purpose. In some cases, granting control at the appropriate time can be a way to control the negotiation. Before granting it, know it’s perceived value.

When you utilize the four factors mentioned above in your negotiations, you’ll be better positioned to use those factors to your benefit. Doing so will allow you to maximize your negotiation efforts… and everything will be right with the world.